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  1. #1

    Let's debate Landjahr triangles

    ref the black LANDJAHR triangle recently sold in Germany one thing that stands out to me is the lettering is white which was reserved for BDM , taking into account the green triangle was white lettering.
    My point is could this triangle have been meant for the BDM. SPEAK OUT

    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    I suppose it is possible. I've not seen a yellow lettering example of this early style triangle. The green was worn by both genders, there was no colored lettering to seperate male from female. The traditions stripe for the green Landjahr is the same color also for both genders like the lettering. I don't have the regulations for the earlier triangle to reference from, if there were even regualtions for it. The black Landjahr triangle did exist, that I am confident of. I had a discussion with Jeff Hammond regarding unusual triangles once and this is what he wrote me about the black Landjahr triangle.

    "Thank you for sending the image of that quite unusual youth triangle. My initial reaction is that such a thing probably is not original, but I applied that test to one shoulder triangle and later found out that I missed out on an extremely rare triangle. One of my collector friends had gotten a Landjahr triangle (the typical green type), and he found that it had been sewn on top of a black Landjahr triangle. I bought the black triangle from him, but when I looked at it, I thought that it just couldn’t be right. For one thing the style of the lettering was different. I sent it back and got my money back. Well many years later I found out that the back Landjahr triangles with a different style of lettering were used for a short time. So that’s what I get for being overly skeptical. I missed out on an original triangle of a type that I will probably never see again."

  3. #3
    yes very interesting one must keep a very open mind with most of this TR stuff there is so much we do not know and also for every regulation quoted there are three pictures around showing it being ignored or broken

    PAUL

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by PAUL AYERST View Post
    yes very interesting one must keep a very open mind with most of this TR stuff there is so much we do not know and also for every regulation quoted there are three pictures around showing it being ignored or broken

    PAUL
    yes Paul i agree
    Hans

  5. #5

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    especially when kids are involved, i think its this area that most of the rules where broken with parents sometimes using the cost effective way of doing things even if it ended in a few corners being cut

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by PAUL AYERST View Post
    yes very interesting one must keep a very open mind with most of this TR stuff there is so much we do not know and also for every regulation quoted there are three pictures around showing it being ignored or broken

    PAUL
    Yes, that is a valid point but I will take a regulation over speculation any day :) It's great hypothesising about whether an item is real or not but more often than not it will be the surfacing of a regulation or a period document or catalogue which will eventually seal the deal. I strongly suspect that the regulations will solve this one too. If we take the 'DJ' knife as an example I would love to see a photograph of one being worn by a DJ boy but if one does surface it will prove only that he is wearing a knife he shouldn't be wearing because the regulations clearly state that there was only one knife.

    The Landjahr was instituted in 1934 and I know that W Saris has a lot of RJF regulations which pre-date this point and I'm willing to bet that he already knows the answer to the question of whether these black ones were made officially for boys and girls.

    I do know that he thinks that these black Landjahr were worn for a short period and possibly in order to avoid any potential confusion with the Oberbann colours still being used at the time.

    The Landjahr was first introduced in Prussia on 29.3.1934 and was extended thereafter to cover further areas. The Oberbanne were finally removed as a structure at the end of 1935 (this took longer than expected) and the specialist colours were officially introduced in early 1936 although they had been announced earlier so these black triangles would have had a short life. Both boys and girls were enrolled on the Landjahr from the beginning so the idea of a black/silver for girls and a black/gold for boys for this interim period could be a theory worth pursuing but as I say, I suspect that Saris will answer this in his book.

    Edit: Verordnunsblatt der RJF 141 19.5.1934 states that the initial issue of the triangles had "Landjahr" in yellow stitching for males and and the same in white for girls.

    blackla.jpg

  7. #7
    COMON NOW you have an opinion on this lets hear about it

  8. #8
    Who, me? I wrote loads! :)

  9. #9

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    Early style triangle Landjahr

    Quote Originally Posted by Gefolgschaft View Post
    I suppose it is possible. I've not seen a yellow lettering example of this early style triangle. The green was worn by both genders, there was no colored lettering to seperate male from female. The traditions stripe for the green Landjahr is the same color also for both genders like the lettering. I don't have the regulations for the earlier triangle to reference from, if there were even regualtions for it. The black Landjahr triangle did exist, that I am confident of. I had a discussion with Jeff Hammond regarding unusual triangles once and this is what he wrote me about the black Landjahr triangle.

    "Thank you for sending the image of that quite unusual youth triangle. My initial reaction is that such a thing probably is not original, but I applied that test to one shoulder triangle and later found out that I missed out on an extremely rare triangle. One of my collector friends had gotten a Landjahr triangle (the typical green type), and he found that it had been sewn on top of a black Landjahr triangle. I bought the black triangle from him, but when I looked at it, I thought that it just couldn’t be right. For one thing the style of the lettering was different. I sent it back and got my money back. Well many years later I found out that the back Landjahr triangles with a different style of lettering were used for a short time. So that’s what I get for being overly skeptical. I missed out on an original triangle of a type that I will probably never see again."
    Hello,
    I have just joined this forum and I am very surprised to see my triangle, bought recently in Hamburg. This early triangle Landjahr was worn from 1934 till end 1935.
    I can confirm you that it is not rare in the german collection.
    I hope that the translation is good because I am French and I do not speak English well.
    - Attached photos both sides of the triangle.
    Best regards

    WIDUKIND
    Attached Images Attached Images

  10. #10
    Very nice item. This one was a smart buy I don't think there will be another up for sale anytime soon.

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