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  1. #11

    Analysis of the badge Garry sent to me

    Analysis of Garry's badge:

    Before i upload pics of the relevant parts, i`ll share a few strange oddities.

    The relevant parts are:

    1. Obvious wear and tear, & Patina on the protruding parts - the places that would first come into any contact with clothing/handling etc..
    2. Patina on the lip of the attachment plate - also a protruding, or raised part of the reverse that would first have come into contact with any clothing/handling and must, if it was worn, show patina/usage
    3. Needle bar surface - If it was taken off, put on etc - then the surface of the needle bar must show this
    4. Enamel - is it period glass enamel? Soft enamel or epoxy?
    5. Outer rim on the obverse - the first place that any "worn" item will show patina. If it was worn, it will show it was.
    6. General patina (scratches, wear and tear) on the surface of the reverse - has it just been rolling aound in the drawer? or has it has the wear added over a long period - and a patina.
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  2. #12
    Although the eagle - diamond - has been added using three holes drilled somewhat off-center on the reverse, and as many say "had a small amount of solder "dripped" into the larger holes to affix it, this has also been glue on, or affixed on using some kind of glue behind the two parts. Around the eagle this is visible in many places. Is this the way Period German "parts" items were placed onto enamel badges? Glued as well?

    There is also a fault with the letter D, with parts of it missing - something that would be visible on "others" made using the same die. NOt that this is unusual, just saying
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  3. #13
    1. Obvious wear and tear, & Patina on the protruding parts - the places that would first come into any contact with clothing/handling etc..

    Can you see the "obvious" wear and tear on these protruding parts? the natural patina? can you? because i cant ... because its just not there. What is there though, is the typical thin layer of silver coating that flakes off - observed on reproduction badges.
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  4. #14
    And the inside tips of the eagles wings ... where did the patina go? if nobody here is going to admit to "stealing" it, then i`d have to say it was never there to begin with. (all i am seeing is the typical bad -corrosion -metal and thin coating found on fakes that have never been worn)
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  5. #15
    2. Patina on the lip of the attachment plate - also a protruding, or raised part of the reverse that would first have come into contact with any clothing/handling and must, if it was worn, show patina/usage

    Any patina here? being a raised part of the reverse, a part that would have first come into contact with any clothing - there must be. Anyone know whats happened to it? coz it aint here. (The red rimmed image is an original plate, showing the usual wear around the lip and the surface)
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  6. #16
    3. Needle bar surface - If it was taken off, put on etc - then the surface of the needle bar must show this

    One of these images show an original pin bar surface, the other is from this HJ badge - can you guess which one has been worn, taken off, put on, 100 times?
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  7. #17
    4. Enamel - is it period glass enamel? Soft enamel or epoxy?

    Its not epoxy, but its also not period Glass enamel. It shows all the traits of soft enamel, with no colored particles (as you will find on original German badges), but burn-holes and rubbish that has stuck to the surface after it came out of the kiln. The "polishing" marks are also typical of reproductions, and not found like this on genuine badges. The first image shows fragments of metal, a sure indication that the item is a reproduction - and something that you will not find on period badges.
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    Last edited by Jo Rivett; 27th July 2012 at 04:36 PM.

  8. #18
    Just as the rim, and reverse, captures all the knocks of life, the glass surface will as well. A period German glass enameled surface looks like this., with not only the score-marks left after polishing visable, but also the "honest patina" the knocks of life.
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  9. #19
    5. Outer rim on the obverse - the first place that any "worn" item will show patina. If it was worn, it will show it was.

    No patina, just corrosion. If this was the rim of a badge i considered authentic, after seeing these, i would have to change my mind. It looks nothing like a period badge, and everything like a reproduction.
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  10. #20
    6. General patina (scratches, wear and tear) on the surface of the reverse - has it just been rolling aound in the drawer? or has it has the wear added over a long period - and a patina.

    Left a picture of the reverse of a genuine small badge, showing the honest patina. On this? (right image) well see for yourself.
    There are plenty of scrapes from it rolling around in a drawer, but none of the scrapes have any kind of patina of their own, just small nicks that cover the whole surface of the reverse
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