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Jungdeutscher Orden [ Young German Order ] - Jungdo

Ordensbuch - Membership ID - No 736 - Bruderschaft Braunschweig

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Reinhard Grube - Born 19 November 1911

Member from 31 August 1927

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Badge/tinnie from Kundgebung [rally] 29 - 30 August 1931 in Hildesheim

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The Jungdeutscher Orden (also known as Jungdo) was one of the many youth groups in the Weimar Republic. It was founded by ex-Wandervogel lieutenant Arthur Mahraun […]. It was an extreme-right antirevolutionary youth group with somewhat confusing ideologi. They wanted a strictly disciplined nation but rejected dictatorship; they were strongly nationalist but advocated a rapprochement with France; they rejected racial supremacy but nevertheless excluded Jews from their ranks. Mahraun spent the twelve-year Hitler era breeding sheep in central Germany and died in 1950, a man forgotten by all but the small community of the faithful. [Jean-Denis Lepage: Hitler Youth, 1922-1945: An Illustrated History]

The Young German Order (in German Jungdeutscher Orden, often abbreviated as Jungdo) was a large para-military organisation in Weimar Germany. Its name and symbol (see picture) were inspired by the Teutonic Knights (Deutscher Orden in German).
The pseudo-chivalric group was involved in nationalistic German politics. Its youth organisation was called Jungdeutsche Jugend (Young German Youth). Jungdo's political arm, the Volksnationale Reichsvereinigung (People's National Reich Association) merged with the German Democratic Party and parts of the Christian Social People's Service in 1930 to become the German State Party.
The group was founded by Artur Mahraun in May 1920 in Kassel. The organisation tried to revive ideals of pre-war Wandervogel youth movement. Very soon it reached 70,000 members, was temporarily banned in early 1921 and, temporarily being the largest of the many para-military groups in the 1920s, later expanded to almost 300,000 members. In 1933 it was banned by the Nazi rulers. [ Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia ]

Artur Mahraun (30 December 1890-29 March 1950) was the founder and leader of the Young German Order (Jungdeutscher Orden or Jungdo) and an early contender for the leadership of the far right youth in Weimar Germany.
Born the son of a privy councillor in Kassel, Mahraun became a career soldier with the Imperial German Army when he enlisted in the Prussian Infantry Regiment No. 83 in 1908. He served with distinction on the Eastern Front during First World War.
Like many of his contemporaries he became involved in Freikorps activity after the Armistice, forming his own group, the Offizierkompagnie Kassel in January 1919. The group was restructured in May 1920 when the Jungdo was adopted and by 1921 Mahraun could call on 70,000 followers. A strong believer in law and order, he rejected revolutionary activity and instead called for Germany to reconcile with France and rebuild her prestige through Franco-German co-operation. At its peak Mahraun's movement, which sought a return to the Wandervogel spirit, could call on as many as 300,000 followers. After meeting Adolf Hitler during the Beer Hall Putsch he quickly became a critic of the Nazi leader.
Mahraun entered the political arena in 1928 when he formed the People's National Reich Association (Völksnationale Reichsvereiningung) as an adult version of his movement, merging it with the German Democratic Party to form the German State Party in 1930. However the move was not a success as the new party performed very poorly at election. Mahraun's party and Jungdo were banned in 1933 and he was for a time imprisoned by the Gestapo.
He was briefly associated with a group called the Nachbarschafts-Bewegung after the war until his death in Gütersloh in 1950.[ Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia ]

After the war Arthur Mahraun claimed that the Jungdeutscher Orden never had more than 37.000 members. [http://www.spiegel.de/spiegel/print/d-44435687.html]
 

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4. Reichsschwesterntag 12 June 1927

Jungdeutscher Orden - 4. Reichsschwesterntag 12 June 1927

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Photos 1932

Photos 1932

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2 Oktober 1932 - Arbeitslager: Neubrasilien, Peissener Pohl (Peissen, Schleswig-Holstein)
FAD = Freiwilliger Arbeitsdienst - Voluntary labor service

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23 Oktober 1932 - Überführung der alten Regimentsfahnen nach Schloss Gottorp (Schleswig, Schleswig-Holstein)
Transfer of the old regimental banners to Gottorp Castle
 

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Photos 1933

Photos 1933

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Ordensjugend 1933

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25 March 1933, Kiel (Schleswig-Holstein), FAD Kundgebung

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1 May 1933

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May 1933
 

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My grandfather Hans, born in the year 1906, joined the youth organisation of the Jungdeutscher Orden, the Jungdeutsche Jugend in the early 1920s.

His estate contains a few photos and a large number of documents. The photos mostly show very young men in different tent camps, as well as wandering young people with musical instruments.
In some of the pictures, the young men wore peaked caps with a badge of the Jungdeutscher Orden.

It's a lot of material, my grandfather was a collector, the old man never threw anything away.
The years of the monthly magazine of that time, which were very nicely put together in special folders, are outstanding.

I would summarize that today as strict German and nationalistic material.
It's a big cardboard box full of papers and photos.
Unfortunately, I don't have access to all of this here, but maybe at a later date...

Many of the photos are reminiscent of the German Wandervogel movement, there are photos that would have to be digitally processed intensively, but that is a matter of time... :(

A very interesting topic, thanks for all the posts!


Micha
P.S. My mother finally wanted to get rid of all this after her father's death in 1967, my grandmother was wise enough to save some boxes full of material, a good decision.
 
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In later years our family member Uwe unfortunately destroyed a lot.
The boy was allowed to search for old stamps and the young man did this intensively.
Entire letters were destroyed during this search, many things were cut into pieces, including many very old photos.
But that can no longer be changed, it is how it is, or was...

One should be thankful, if anything is left at all, and that is seldom the case in very many families...

Micha
 
From the many letters, the memories and the legacies of my grandfather, I always recognized a kind of loss.

His father, a soldier in World War I, mutated into a pacifist, his son Hans flirted with the National Socialists, and in later years achieved the rank of "Arbeitsführer" in the RAD.
It wasn't what the father had expected from his only son, but the son had given his soul and intellectual life to National Socialism, perhaps a chance of becoming a general in the labor services later, whatever.

I would have loved to have met his father, our great-grandfather Heinrich-Christian, but he died a good 10 years before I was born.
When I was a little boy I tended the grave of my great-grandparents, this grave no longer exists, it was leveled decades ago.

This is the passage of time, everything is stone and ash, nothing remains.

Micha
I remember the place, the cemetery, the in-laws' grave that my grandmother and I always tended, today it's like a dream, these people are simply gone.
 
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I'm not angry with my grandfather for his political enthusiasm. The labor services were his fulfillment.
Finally uniforms again, finally discipline and order again, from the FAD to the NSAD to the RAD, and to a bitter end in the year 1945.

Who of us would have acted differently at the time, probably not me?
It's easy to judge people after the fact, but none of us were there at the time.
Heroes were few, the followers and advocates were the rule, often for very personal reasons...

People are for profit, but who am I telling...

Micha
 
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